Richard, John and Mattew Pickering were arrested on the 17 August 1826, and appeared before the Examining Magistrate on the 18 August, for a crime committed the crime on the 16 August 1826. At the examination, Mathew and Richard were discharged but were re-arrested on the 20 August to appear before the Examining Magistrate on the 21 and 25 August. All three were committed for trial on the 26 August. They were tried about 7 months later on the 24 March 1827.

The crime related to housebreaking and theft of “two pieces of current money and silver coins of this realm called half crowns of the value of five shillings twenty gowns of the value of five pounds four petticoats of the value of five shillings four sheets of the value of ten shillings two sets of pillow cases of the value of five shillings two worsted shawls of the value of six shillings one cloth shawl of the value of four shillings three silk handkerchiefs of the value of three shillings one coat of the value of thirty shillings one Kerseymere waistcoat of the value of five shillings one pair of Kerseymere breeches of the value of six shillings one cloak of the value of ten shillings one yard of muslin of the value of one shilling four pairs of stockings of the value of four shillings, aprons of the value of two shillings one pair of woman’s half boots of the value of five shillings and four gown pieces of the value of twenty shillings of the many goods and chattels of the said Thomas Dewsnap in the said dwelling house then out and there being six promissory notes for the payment of one pound each and being of the value of one pound each the said several promissory Notes being then and there the property of the said Thomas Dewsnap and in full force in the said Dwelling-House then and there also being the several sums of money mentioned therein and secured thereby then and there remaining wholly unsatisfied then and there feloniously did steal take and carry away against the form of the Statute in that case made and provided and against the peace of our said Lord the King his Crown and Dignity.”

They were convicted in the York Assizes on 24 March 1827 of housebreaking, involving the theft of money and clothing. John did not deny having sold the clothing but claimed that they were found and that he had been framed. It is interesting that he was said to have indicated when selling the garments that the cheap prices came about because they were castoffs of the wives of his brothers and himself.

They were transported on the convict vessel “Prince Regent”. The Prince Regent arrived in Sydney 27th September 1827.

A further brother, Joseph was transported on the Marquis of Huntley in 1830 for seven years for stealing bacon.